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IFAD / TAJIKISTAN GENDER EQUALITY IN FARMING

Deep inside Tajikistan’s rural towns and villages, it's common to see women out working in the fields. With 20 percent of the workforce, predominantly men, working abroad, the country relies on women to carry out most of its agricultural labour. IFAD
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00:04:20
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MAMS Id
3181507
Parent Id
3181507
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unifeed240307e
Description

STORY: IFAD / TAJIKISTAN GENDER EQUALITY IN FARMING
TRT: 4:19
SOURCE: IFAD
RESTRICTION: EMBARGO TILL 7PM EST, 07 MARCH 2024
LANGUAGE: TAJIK / NATS

DATELINE: 29-30 OCTOBER 2024, MOHINAV VILLAGE, TAJIKISTAN

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Shotlist

MOHINAV VILLAGE, DUSTI DISTRICT, KHATLON REGION, SOUTHWESTERN TAJIKISTAN

1. Various shots, woman picking apples.
2. Various shots, harvesting peanuts and weeding the field – Mohinav Village, Dusti district
3. Wide shot, man hoeing field
4. Wide shot, man rotavating field
5. Aerial shot, Mohinav village
6. Wide shot, Women in group – Mohinav (woman on far right is Halima Jumaeva)
7. SOUNDBITE (Tajik) Jumaeva Halima, Chief of Mohinav Village Organization:
“We had a real challenge having access to tractors or finding tractor operators. Even if or when we could find a tractor in a neighbouring community, they would come with delay.”
8. Various shots, Farmyard machinery

JAFR VILLAGE, RASHT DISTRICT, NORTH-EASTERN TAJIKISTAN

9. Wide shot, turkey farming
10. SOUNDBITE (Tajik) Raikhana Rahmonova, Leader Wigg Poultry Farming Group:
“we have food security – we sell, and we buy what we need, and we also eat the turkeys.”
11. Wide shot, Woman shelling corn
12. Various shots, filling up jars.
13. UPSOUND women with pickling
"2.48 Jars…”
14.SOUNDBITE (Tajik) Zulhijamo Davlatova, Leader Wigg Food Preservation Group:
“We used to lose much of our fruit and vegetables. Now we preserve and sell them. We also save some for ourselves for the winter.”

KUHDOMAN VILLAGE, DUSTI DISTRICT, KHATLON REGION, SOUTHWESTERN TAJIKISTAN

15.Wide shot, Woman milking cow
16. Med shot, women cutting fruit.
17. Med shot, woman shelling peanuts.
18. SOUNDBITE (English) Roberto Longo, Tajikistan Country Director, IFAD:
“As of June 2023, the project has supported around 180 village organisations, which means between 50-60,000 households, and more than 300,000 people have been supported by the project.”

JAFR VILLAGE, RASHT DISTRICT, NORTH-EASTERN TAJIKISTAN

19. Med shot, turkey pictures

MOHINAV VILLAGE, DUSTI DISTRICT, KHATLON REGION, SOUTHWESTERN TAJIKISTAN

20. Med shot, woman in greenhouses.
21.Wide shot, ploughing fields.

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Storyline

Many things have changed in Tajikistan over the past decade. The country has experienced strong economic growth above 7percent and poverty levels are down to just 12 percent.

This is in some part due to the 1.5 million mostly male workers who are employed abroad, predominantly in Russia, and send money home.

Yet some things have not changed. Women, particularly those working in agriculture, are still accustomed to taking orders from men. But all that could be changing.

On International Women’s Day we find out how women groups in the country are taking leadership roles and becoming more involved in in sustainable agriculture and food security in their country.

Deep inside Tajikistan’s rural towns and villages, it's common to see women out working in the fields. With 20 percent of the workforce, predominantly men, working abroad, the country relies on women to carry out most of its agricultural labour.

The sector employs more than 60 percent of the country’s population, yet 80 percent of the land is owned by men and the same number head up local ‘dekhans ‘or farms.

However, a project funded by the UN’s International Fund for Agricultural Development, and the Government of Tajikistan has provided more women with the opportunity to make financial and operational decisions, running their own businesses.

Halima leads her village organisation in southwestern Tajikistan’s Dusti district. They have received funding from the project but decided as a group what they would invest in.

They agreed to buy agricultural equipment to help them modernise their farms and improve production.

SOUNDBITE (Tajik) Jumaeva Halima, Chief of Mohinav Village Organization:
“We had a real challenge having access to tractors or finding tractor operators. Even if or when we could find a tractor in a neighbouring community, they would come with delay.”

The new machinery helped them improve their production of hay, rice and vegetables, helping them to prepare their fields and harvest their crops such as potatoes and vegetables much quicker, which they can sell, as well as hiring it out to others to use.

Across Tajikistan, the project has supported poor rural women to set up Women’s Income Generating Groups (WIGGs) that have allowed them to start their own income-generating businesses like poultry farming.

SOUNDBITE (Tajik) Raikhana Rahmonova, Leader Wigg Poultry Farming Group:
“we have food security – we sell, and we buy what we need, and we also eat the turkeys.”

And a vegetable canning and pickling business.

SOUNDBITE (Tajik) Zulhijamo Davlatova, Leader Wigg Food Preservation Group:

“We used to lose much of our fruit and vegetables. Now we preserve and sell them. We also save some for ourselves for the winter.”

The result is that the women are now earning their own money and making decisions for themselves, supporting themselves and their households.

SOUNDBITE (English) Roberto Longo, Tajikistan Country Director, IFAD:
“As of June 2023, the project has supported around 180 village organisations, which means between 50-60,000 households, and more than 300,000 people have been supported by the project.”

Rural women still have a long way to go to achieve equality in farms, but here in Southwest Tajikistan they are on the right track.

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