Unifeed

SOUTH SUDAN / RETURNEES

Nearly two thousand returnees arrived at Juba port in South Sudan Monday, almost five months after South Sudan's independence. UNMISS
U111129d
Video Length
00:02:42
Production Date
Asset Language
Subject Topical
Geographic Subject
MAMS Id
U111129d
Description

STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / RETURNEES
TRT: 2:42
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /ARABIC/ NATS

DATELINE: 28/29 NOVEMBER 2011, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

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Shotlist

1. Med shot, barge carrying returnees arriving Juba Port
2. Med shot, relatives waiting to welcome arriving returnees
3. Med shot, barge pulling into port and coming to a halt
4. Close up, Sign at port reading “Best wishes for your new life in the Republic if South Sudan”
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Duer ut Duer Makuach, Chairperson of the Relief Rehabilitation Commission:
“It is emotional for us because we fought for 21 years because we wanted to liberate this country. This country is liberated for the sons and daughters of this country to come from the Republic of Sudan, coming back home freely and coming to a free country it is emotional for them as well as for us.”
6. Wide shot, returnees leaving barge
7. Wide shot, returnees gathered on land
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Jan deWilde Chief of Missions, IOM:
“This particular set of barges has 3,200 and some passengers on it – and four passenger barges, there are eight baggage barges coming with them. Those people will disembark here in Juba. They will be taken to a way-station here in Juba and then as soon as possible onward on-land transportation will be arranged for them.”
9. Med shot, woman weeping (for the death of child)
12. Med shot, relatives hugging those who have arrived
13. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Peter Laku, returnee:
“I am very happy because my family and the people of the South have come to welcome us. I am very happy to be back home.”
14. Various shots, children being vaccinated
15. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Betty Nelson, returnee:
“The journey was not bad. I was working as a nurse, but unfortunately we lost two children on the way.”
16. Wide shots, port area with returnees milling with their luggage

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Storyline

Almost five months after South Sudan’s independence and after a 15-day barge journey on the Nile river which started from Kosti Port in Sudan, close to two thousand returnees arrived Juba port in South Sudan, last Monday (28 November).

A total of 3,200 returnees were expected to arrive within the week (28/11–02/12), some of whom will join their families in Juba town and its environs, whilst others will continue onward to their home States by road.

Chairperson of the Relief and the Rehabilitation Commission (RRC) Duer Tut Duer Makuach witnessed the arrival of the returnees.

SOUNDBITE (English) Duer ut Duer Makuach, Chairperson of the Relief Rehabilitation Commission
“It is emotional for us because we fought for 21 years because we wanted to liberate this country. This country is liberated for the sons and daughters of this country to come from the Republic of Sudan, coming back home freely and coming to a free country it is emotional for them as well as for us.”

The International Organization for Migration (IOM), the United Nations High Commission for Refugees and the Relief and the Rehabilitation Commission are working together to ensure the returnees are transported to where they would like to go.

SOUNDBITE (English) Jan de Wilde, Chief of Missions, IOM:
“This particular set of barges has 3,200 and some passengers on it – and four passenger barges, there are eight baggage barges coming with them. Those people will disembark here in Juba. They will be taken to a way-station here in Juba and then as soon as possible onward on-land transportation will be arranged for them.”

More returnees are expected from Kosti in Sudan in the next few months.
SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Peter Laku, returnee:
“I am very happy because my family and the people of the South have come to welcome us. I am very happy to be back home.”

The Nile journey is a difficult one. On this trip, two children died on board and on arrival a mother weeps for her lost child.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Betty Nelson, returnee:
“The journey was not bad. I was working as a nurse, but unfortunately we lost two children on the way.”

On arrival at the port, organisations like Unicef stationed personnel to conduct a polio and measles immunisation to ensure that the children who missed a recent polio vaccination were able to receive their immunisations.

Southern Sudanese voted in a referendum which resulted in the separation of Africa’s largest country, and the formation of South Sudan. Southern Sudanese have been travelling to the South in large numbers since the end of October, and it is estimated that close to 350,000 have travelled in spontaneous and organised movements.

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